Top 5 Bridal Tropes to Make You Hear Wedding Bells

By Kayla King, Editorial Assistant for Harlequin Intrigue

It’s June, which is still the luckiest month of the year to get married according to ancient Roman traditions. To get married in June was to receive the blessing of Juno, goddess of marriage and childbirth. Nowadays it’s more about great weather and floral selections, but summer or winter, we love to attend and read about that special celebration of love!

1. Always the bridesmaid…no longer! This one is definitely tried-and-true, but tends to represent some of the more unconventional stories of a bride who might have thought it wasn’t going to happen for her.  See also: always the best man!

2. The jilted bride, or anyone left at the altar. This trope is great for high drama—a devastating betrayal on the “happiest day” that turns around into a Happily Ever After after all!

3. Runaway bride. This is the other perspective of the above.  This bride isn’t necessarily commitment-phobic, and honestly if it feels so wrong that you’re running in the opposite direction, it’s probably best not to go through with it.  She has her reasons and we want to read about them!

4. Mail-order bride. I’ll level with you, this was a trope I wasn’t sure I could love when I first dipped into romance.  But this trope has some of the sweetest, most touching stories.  Love doesn’t always happen at first sight.  And…what if it does when you were expecting a different arrangement?  This trope is definitely worth some exploration.

5. Marriage of convenience. Did I leave the best for last?  That may be a matter of opinion, but this is another long standing favorite trope of ours!  This is a big umbrella trope that covers so many wonderful scenarios that all follow a similar narrative of love appearing where it was least expected, and sometimes least wanted.

Check out some of our latest romances featuring wedding bells and Happily Ever Afters below!

   

   

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Comments

  1. Chrissie

    I love all the bridal tropes. It is also fun when there is a twist like in the movie “Made of Honor” with Patrick Dempsey, where he is the ‘maid of honor’ to his best friend who just happens to be the opposite sex. It is a hoot. I want to come up with a unique twist like that. I’m thinking on it! 🙂

  2. Kimber Li

    Marriage is so disposable in our present culture that a writer really needs to work at why it’s such a big deal to the couples in these stories. Otherwise, it’s ‘so what?’ for most of these tropes.

    • Chrissie

      Yes and no. When I got married the first time, I wanted a quiet wedding but the groom’s family was HUGE and they wanted this big all day all night affair, even starting the day before with family dinners and such. I really didn’t like it, but I did it. The second time around, the love of my life and I both agreed to get married before we died of the bronchitis we both had, went home from the doctor’s office, changed into sweaters and jeans (it was cold/winter) and drove a couple towns away to the justice of the peace and were married in his tiny, mural-painted living room. Simple and my favorite. But there are families out there that it means a lot to and they spend far too much but they are supposed to be going into this marriage to last forever. So at the time it is worth it for them, if that’s what they want. And sometimes it works. I have friends who have been married since high school. Different strokes, ya know?

    • Kimber Li

      I’m talking about the marriage not the wedding. Best example: Kim Kardashion spending millions on a televised wedding and the marriage lasted less than two months. Another celebrity couple sneaked away, got married at a courthouse, and are still happily married. As a reader, I need to believe that the couple in question understand and value marriage and that they’re *capable* of keeping their vows by The End.